Author Archives: iltvignocchi

ILCA Gold Award Winner

It is an amazing moment for ILT Vignocchi.  We have been awarded a Gold Award from the Illinois Landscape Contractor’s Association (ILCA).  It is one of two Gold Awards that we received this year.  Below is a visual tour of the first project in Skokie, Illinois.  Subscribe to our YouTube channel to explore old videos as well as new…let them inspire you to get outside.  Dream of the possibilities.  And most important.  Call us NOW to help you create them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4I7v52gm4zQ

Happy 50th Birthday ILT Vignocchi!!

Turning 50 is such a milestone for any business.  Dips in the economy, increasing regulations, labor issues and shortages.  There are so many ways a company can get off track.  As I contemplate where we have been, of course I think of our unwavering reputation for integrity, artistry and quality.  You consider the massive golf courses, Chicago Botanic Garden installations, as well as corporate and municipal work.  I regard those residential projects that not only won awards but gave our employees such satisfaction and our customers heartfelt joy.

But to me it is more than that.

I don’t know if I have a memory when ILT didn’t exist.  You see, as ILT turns 50, I will be turning 47.  The memories of our company are like fabric woven into my life.

When I watch the countless trucks and trailers roll out of the yard at sunrise each and every morning I indulge the nostalgia of our company’s youth.

I remember Sorney Leahy who let me sit inside his desk drawer when I was very small and let me play with his phone.  Or going to a job site with my dad on a Saturday.  He’d hoist me up on his shoulders and then put me down so I could hug my Nono who was working with our men.  A favorite is my mother who would spend hours picking up sticks before the maintenance crew came to our house so they would not have to bother.

50 years ago there were no computers.  Dad used to spend countless nights drawing plans, scrunching up vellum with discarded ideas and yes, taking calls from his customers on his home phone.

I think life is different when you are in a family business.  Of course it is hard and there are arguments, lots.  But there is a short cut with family that makes it easier, because you know in the end, you will always love one another.

  • Donna Vignocchi Zych

Owner ILT Vignocchi

Benefits of Dormant Pruning

As landscape architects and arborists we often find that plant material on our new residential, commercial and HOA sites have been left to get overgrown and mismanaged. The key to getting the plant material looking healthy, vibrant and growing properly again is of course dormant pruning.

Dormant pruning takes place during the winter months and this is valuable for many reasons. With the leaves absent precision pruning is much easier. Cutting the plant in the right spot helps the plant heal better and faster in the growing season. It also allows us to see the shape of the plant better and see limbs and stems that are either damaged, diseased or crossing. The colder months also mean less airborne diseases that could affect the fresh wounds of plants.

A sure sign that dormant pruning needs to be done is the evidence of witches broom which is a dense mass of shoots growing from a single point. This happens when the plant is perpetually pruned or sheared on the top and never in the middle or base of the plant. This type of pruning leads to a plant that is top heavy with leaves, but looks bare and leggy on the stems and base.

Dormant pruning removes the witches broom, allows us to remove overgrown stems at the base of the plant and makes it easier to remove unwanted growth. These fixes allow sunlight and air to get to the entire plant and not only to the top sections. Heights of plants are also much more easily controlled during dormant pruning allowing the plant to take on a natural shape during the growing season without blocking windows or doors.

-Aaron Zych

Landscape Architect  & Certified Arborist

Tulip Trivia

As I sit on this blisteringly cold January day my mind drifts to our lovely friend, the tulip.

You see my mother loves tulips.  Even though we lived in Riverwoods and had to contend with deer feasting on them she would plant them.  Not en masse but in charming little bundles that would cheerfully pop up in spring.  She would sometimes even pair them with Allium, in order to deter our beautiful yet hungry friends.

Her love affair continues today, although now she must battle chipmunks and squirrels who enjoy digging them up and moving them around.  This year I finally convinced her to even try my favorite tulip blend created by a most trusted vendor.  It’s called French Blend.  Wow, wait until she sees her spring display!

French Blend Tulip

The French Tulip Blend

It’s difficult to think of spring on such a snow covered day, but it will come.  My contemplating of the tulip has led me to some poking around.  I’ve found some interesting tidbits that I thought I’d share…

  1. Origin Story:  Thought that tulips originated in Holland?  They did not.  It is widely believed that they were first cultivated in a corridor along the 40° latitude between Northern China and Southern Europe.
  2. Tulips travel to Turkey:  When the tulip first made its way to Turkey it was revered by the Sultan and was cultivated solely for his pleasure and that of his entourage.  He forbid tulips to bought or sold outside of the capital.  The punishment?  Exile.
  3. A Status Symbol:  Tulips were cultivated to be curated.  They became a symbol of status and power for both Royalty and the very wealthy.  Mirrors were placed around arrangements and in gardens to create the appearance that the owner could afford more than they actually could.
  4. A Bricklayer’s Wage for 15 years:  At the height of what is called “Tulip Mania” once they had reached Holland, a single bulb would go for the price of a homepurchased in Amsterdam, or… a bricklayer’s wage for 15 years.
  5. There is an actual Tulip Museum…Outside:  Keukenhof is worth the visit in May each year.  I have been and I will never forget it.  It is display garden after garden that is painstakingly designed and installed annually.

And that my friends, is just some of the fun facts around out delightful spring friend.

Donna Vignocchi Zych

The Power of Connecting with People

It was another great ilandscape show held at the Schaumburg Convention Center last week.  I found it so invigorating for so many reasons…new technologies and products, interesting seminars and seeing all the award winning projects from 2018 (more on that next week)!  The show is meticulously planned out by the Illinois Landscape Contractor’s Association’s Experience, Awards and Education committees and ILCA’s amazing staff and Executive Director.  In short, it’s a very big deal attracting 6,800 attendees.

I think most people dread attending events of its nature.  I saw several people, even those promoting products that definitely fit that bill.  But that attitude is SUCH a waste of an opportunity.  One of my favorite things to do when I come across those people is to interact with them, pull them out of their shell.  Maybe if I’m lucky I’ll get a laugh.  Try to turn around their day.

That’s the human interaction that is so important.  Sure sharing best practices, learning about new innovative ideas, those are vital to our business.  But there are those moments in between.  Asking about someone’s kid without trying to sell them something, but because you care.  Telling someone you love their tie, because you actually DO.

Put simply, taking time away from thinking about your problems, and to do lists and general needs to be inquisitive of someone else’s.  Try it, it’s very fulfilling, especially face to face and not through a text message.

I hope that one day we don’t completely lose that feeling we should all feel after a genuine face to face conversation.  That it would be an actual tragedy to have the true beauty of a laughing smiling face in person be replaced by yet another clever emoji.

Harry Vignocchi

Harry Vignocchi having some fun at the ilandscape show!

Turf Management: Adjusting to Drought

If your property does not have an automated irrigation system and you have not watered your turf regularly this summer, you may have noticed it is turning brown, indicating it is reacting to the impact of the summer drought we are in the midst of here in the northern Chicagoland area.  Your grass has a natural drought defense system which shuts down the expendable parts of the plant in an effort to keep its roots alive, hence the brown coloration at the surface. The good news is, turf grasses are resilient plants and can survive a long time without water. The bad news is, not only does the brown grass not look good, the dormant grass will become more susceptible to invasive weeds and crabgrass which tend to find room to root and grow in the stressed turf.  Generally, though, once moisture returns, most grasses will recover without leaving permanent damage.  The weeds and crabgrass can be treated, and your once beautiful lawn should be restored.

The simplest and best practice that we have found for helping the turf survive and recover from the effects of a drought, if regular watering is not an option, is to make some simple adjustments to our mowing operations.  We raise our mower blades slightly, to 3″ – 3.5″, to minimize the heat/sun exposure of the root systems of the turf that results from mowing too low in these hot, dry conditions.  Additionally, you will find that we will forgo mowing whenever warranted, on a given visit, if the grass has gone dormant and has not grown sufficiently to necessitate a mowing.  This will prevent the potential damage that could be done to the dry, brittle grass blades as the heavy mower wheels roll over them.  The added benefit of not mowing is the extra time we can spend on your property detailing and performing more labor-intensive gardening operations.

Furthermore, the longer grass blades will shade the ground underneath, keeping it cooler and inhibiting water evaporation. The granular fertilizer we apply during your lawn care visits will stimulate new growth once rain returns or the lawn is watered. If you are going to water your lawn, you must be consistent. If you cannot deeply water your lawn one inch or more per week, it is better to let your lawn go into a state of dormancy.  Light, infrequent watering can do more harm than good as it encourages shallow root growth which then makes the turf even more susceptible to disease and insect infestations during periods of stress.  So, it is best to commit to keep up with the watering or let it go and wait out the drought.

When temperatures start to cool down and rainfall increases, your lawn should come out of dormancy and begin to recover. The turf plants will start growing new roots and new plants will germinate to replace those that were damaged or even killed during the summer. Core aeration and over seeding in the fall are two great ways to help your lawn recover from a tough drought season, like the one we are currently experiencing. Strengthening the roots is critical to maintaining healthy turf, and the core aeration process will open the lawn to provide more air, water and nutrients into the turf root zone.  Following up the coring operation immediately with over seeding will help to generate new seedlings to fill in sparse areas. Grass seed needs to come in contact with soil and receive adequate moisture to remain viable once the germination process begins. A good portion of the seed will end up in the core holes, which ends up being a great place for the seed to germinate. The soil in the core holes will remain moist and cool, and the seed will have a much better chance of germinating.

Kevin T Block

Morton Arboretum Troll Hunt

This past weekend, on a particular hot sunny Chicago day, our family thought it would be an adventure to visit Chicago’s Morton Arboretum to see the Troll Hunt Exhibit…with our 9 year old daughter.  Did I mention it was very hot, very sunny, AND that the trolls in some places are 3/4 of a mile from parking areas?  It was really fun for the first half hour, let me tell you.

But although nature became a bit of a bore to our darling daughter, the Arboretum is a marvel to me.  It is nothing like a Botanic Garden, it is more like an organized forest for one.  Another shocking revaluation?   There are weeds, lots of them, which I found mind blowing but very refreshing.

The Arboretum was founded in 1922 buy the son of the man who founded Arbor Day.  It spans a tremendous 1,700 acres holding more than 222,000 live plants representing nearly 4,300 taxa from around the world.  What is so wonderful is that it made me feel so small, so unimportant, yet so at peace.

The Trolls, although fantastic, were such a secondary draw to all of the different species, elegant groves, and meandering walkways.  One thing I did appreciate about the Trolls is they were fashioned to completely meld into nature…as if they lived there in harmony in what felt like the most peaceful place on Earth.

During these times when tensions always seem to run high and meaningful personal interaction is on the decline, I encourage you.  Take your family, take a friend, go with a neighbor.  Walk around and take in the splendor.  Talk to one another.  It’s good for your soul.

-Donna Vignocchi Zych

Suburban Sanctuary NEW You tube video

On a sprawling 3 acres in Itasca, Illinois this property includes several relaxing vignettes, a putting green and tennis court.  Perfect for entertaining it also boasts a custom fireplace and spa.